The one problem which befalls all bodyboarders is a runaway board. No matter how calm the water, a board will find its way somewhere else, or more likely. You will find your way into the water, and the board will go where the current takes it. There is no worse feeling as a boarder than seeing your board float off in the opposite direction. Add in some dangerous waters, and sometimes it is better to leave your board to disappear, rather than chase after it and put yourself in danger.

Adding the best bodyboard leash to your board can save you from a lot of headaches. Leashes come with plugs to attach them to your board and a cuff on the other end of a coil, which attaches to your bicep or your wrist. If you do come off your board, then the board is still attached to you and cannot get away.

We love to bodyboard, and we will not leave the house without a leash. A small investment has saved many a board. Here are our top bodyboard leashes of 2018.

Best-Bodyboard-Leash-in-2018

How To Choose A Bodyboard Leash – Buying Guide

How To Choose The Best Bodyboard Leash - Buying Guide How to Wear a Leash I cannot start this section without saying that it is extremely easy to wear a bodyboard leash. The only problems you will run into will be with incorrect placement or sizes. Once you know how to attach your leash, you will have no problem doing it every single time. Having said that, there are a few simple things which you can do to ensure your own safety and the safety of our board. You should also have correct placement of your plug on your board, and of the leash on your arm. But, before we go into all of that, you should know the basic terminology, and what to look out for when it comes to looking for a bodyboard leash. Plugs The plugs attach the leash to your board. You want something made from high-quality materials. The plugs should fasten together and give a secure hold on your board. The ends of the plugs should be flat so that they sit flush with your board. You do not want to be annoyed with them when they are on your board. You should also look out for plugs which have the means to attach the string internally instead of having loops around your board. The more seamless of a fit you can get, the better. String The string should be short, but also long enough to join the plug and coils together. There should be enough room for a little movement when you and the boar move. The function of the string is to join those two elements together with some flexibility. When looking at the string, it should be strong and tough. It will be pulled on a lot as you move through the water. You do not want it to snap while you are in the water. The tie on the string should also be tight so that it does not slacken and come loose. Cuffs The cuff should be comfortable to wear. This is probably the most important function of the cuff. Granted, it should stay on your arm and keep you teetered to the board, but a good leash will become part of you too. Good cuffs are generally made from neoprene with a velcro strap. They should be durable and waterproof. The velcro should be durable and should not begin to break down after a few uses. Look for a wide cuff to add comfort when you are wearing it. You should also look for a brass connecter. The cuff will join to the coil, and there should be a connecter which should have a wide range of movement. Brass is ideal for this and will provide a long-lasting bodyboard leash. Coils The choir will be your buffer between the cuff and the plug. It should be long enough to give you some room on the board, but short enough that when you do come off the board, the board does not get too far. The coil should be springy so that it can lengthen and shorten depending on your needs. Look for a coil made from polyurethane or another high-quality material. FAQs Q: Should I Use A Bicep Leash Or A Wrist Leash? A: There are two types of bodyboard leash. As the question would suggest, one attaches to your bicep, and one attaches to your wrist. You can choose between either option, depending on your preferences, and there really is no right or wrong answer when it comes to picking. Most often you will find wrist leashes on beginner riders or drop-knee bodyboarding. For beginners, the draw is the ease of getting your board back. When you do come off your board, it is easy to grab the cord and bring your board back to you. For drop-knee bodyboarders, it makes sense, as you are sitting higher on your board. Instead of laying flat as you surf through the waves, you are on one knee. Having the leash on your bicep could provide too much distance between the cuff and the board, creating a little tension and throwing the experience off. As you progress in your bodyboarding adventure, or if you have boarded for a while, then you will probably have the leash on your bicep. As you become more used to being in the water with your board, you will find it easier to get your board back should you come off. Having the leash on your wrist stops the coil from getting in your way when you are paddling through the water. When it is on your wrist, you are constantly pulling the coil through the water with you. Q: How Should A Bodyboard Leash Fit? A: The quick answer is, that it should fit comfortably. Most bodyboard leashes will come with a velcro strap, so it is easy to have the leash fit tightly and comfortably. When the cuff is around your wrist or bicep, it should be tight enough that it does not move and slip down your arm, but the important thing to focus on, is that it does not bite into your skin. When your arm is relaxed, the leash should not be digging into your skin. Q: How Do You Put On A Bicep Or Wrist Leash? A: The first thing to do, is to choose where you are going to put the leash. Are you going to attach it to your wrist or to your bicep? Bend your arm so that it is at a right angle (bent at the elbow), and flex your arm a little (this position will help to recreate the position and feel of your arm as you are paddling through the water). Place the cuff on your arm and wrap the velcro around so that it is tight but comfortable. Move your arm around with the cuff on. Bend it back and forth, and flex and un-flex. If the cuff does not feel good, then loosen or tighten it. When you have the perfect fit, you are ready to bodyboard. Q: How Do I Plug Your Bodyboard For A Leash? A: Plugging your board for a leash is a relatively simple operation, and one which you can do by yourself, but there are some strict guidelines about how this should be done and where you can put the plug, so that you get the best placement, best ride, and do not damage your board in the process. If your board already has a hole for a plug, then you do not need to do anything. Buy a leash and attach it to your board. If you do not have a hole in your board, then you can add one quickly, and with tools you probably have around your house. The first thing to do is to choose the position of the hole you are going to create. There are some places where you should not create a hole in your board. Most bodyboards come with a stinger inside. Small boards will have one, and larger boards can have two. A stinger is a plastic rod which sits inside the foam of your board, to strengthen the board. Not all boards have one, so yours may not, but if you hold your board up to the light, then you should be able to see the stringer inside. Do not create a hole where the stringer is (obviously), and do not create one too close to the stringer. You should aim to have the hole at least an inch from a stringer. If you do create a hole too close, then water can get inside and around the stringer. This may not actually damage your board, but the water can sit in there, making your board a little heavier. You will also have to put up with the noise of the water sloshing around. You should also not create a hole close to the edge of the board. If you do create one too close, then the structural integrity can become compromised, and a large wave could cause the plug to be ripped from the hole, leaving a large gash in your board. Keep the hole at least two inches from the side of the board. The last place to avoid is where the board begins to curve up toward the nose of the board. You should be looking for a flat piece of the board to make your hole in. So, what do you need to think about when choosing the placement? One of the most obvious things to think about is whether you are going to be wearing the leash on your left arm or your right arm. The arm you are wearing the leash on will dictate the side of the board you will attach the plug to. You should also know if you are going to wear the leash on your wrist or your bicep. This will dictate how far up the board the plug will be. The last thing to think about is whether you are going to ride prone or drop-knee. A prone rider is one who rides with their body flat on the board. A drop-knee rider rides with one knee and one foot on the board. Your distance between the cuff and the board will dictate where on the board you can place the plug, so you do not create too much tension in the coil. Once you have used all of the information at your disposal to choose where you can and cannot place the plug, you should have a general idea in mind. Within that area, you can choose the spot which feels best to you. Take into account what feels good, and also what looks good. This hole is going to be permanent, so you should be happy with the position before you commit to it. Make sure that the plug is not going to be under any points of pressure, such as your chest if you are riding prone, or your knee if you are riding drop-knee. Once you have the exact position, mark it with a marker, and you are ready to create the hole. A Phillips head screwdriver will do the trick. A drill will work also. Take your board and place it on a flat surface. Lay a towel underneath if you are worried about the bottom of the board, but remember that this could get damaged when you make your hole. Take your tool (either the screwdriver or drill) and line it up as straight as possible. You are going to push the screwdriver through the board and out the other side. Apply pressure to the screwdriver, and twist it as you push through to help it through the foam. Once you are done, flip the board and push through from the other side to make a clean hole. Now, take your flu and check it for size. There are two parts to the plug, so be sure to check the larger of the two pieces first. If the plug does not fit, then use your screwdriver to widen the hols slightly. You want to try and create an exact fit, so enlarge the hole a little at a time. Once the largest piece fits snugly, push in the second part from the other side and twist the two parts to tighten them. Once the two pieces of the plug will not tighten anymore, you can use a small coin to give them a final tighten. Each side of the plug should end up flush with the board. You will create a seal which will not allow the water in (most of the time), but do not worry if the water does get in. The foam interior is waterproof, so the water will not get into the material and damage it. Now, make sure to take care of your leash once it is attached. Rinse your leash after each outing in the water (you should be doing the same with your board). You do not want the salt water sitting on your leash for too long, or it can become corrosive. When you are storing your leash, you should store it in the same place as you board. The leash should be kept out of direct sunlight when in storage. It should be kept somewhere cool and dry. If you are strong the board and leash together, you should store them in a place where there is no chance of the leash being snagged. You do not want to damage the leash or the board. Globo Surf Overview A few bucks and you may not have to buy yourself a new bodyboard. If you let a bodyboard escape in the ocean, you may as well be throwing your money into the water. A good bodyboard leash will fit you comfortably and give you security. If you have a leash correctly attached to your board, you will be taking a precaution which will save your board. Even if your board does not get away from you, retrieving it after falling in the water is infinitely easier with a leash attached. It does not matter if you are buying one for safety or to make your life easier, it just makes sense to have one with you at all times. The best bodyboarding leashes were not hard to find. Our top five are the very best that the boarding wold has to offer (in our opinion). With the information above, you can make an informed choice when it comes to enhancing your bodyboarding experience. Be safe out there.

How to Wear a Leash

I cannot start this section without saying that it is extremely easy to wear a bodyboard leash. The only problems you will run into will be with incorrect placement or sizes. Once you know how to attach your leash, you will have no problem doing it every single time.

Having said that, there are a few simple things which you can do to ensure your own safety and the safety of our board. You should also have correct placement of your plug on your board, and of the leash on your arm. But, before we go into all of that, you should know the basic terminology, and what to look out for when it comes to looking for a bodyboard leash.

Plugs

The plugs attach the leash to your board. You want something made from high-quality materials. The plugs should fasten together and give a secure hold on your board. The ends of the plugs should be flat so that they sit flush with your board. You do not want to be annoyed with them when they are on your board.

You should also look out for plugs which have the means to attach the string internally instead of having loops around your board. The more seamless of a fit you can get, the better.

String

The string should be short, but also long enough to join the plug and coils together. There should be enough room for a little movement when you and the boar move. The function of the string is to join those two elements together with some flexibility. When looking at the string, it should be strong and tough. It will be pulled on a lot as you move through the water. You do not want it to snap while you are in the water. The tie on the string should also be tight so that it does not slacken and come loose.

Cuffs

The cuff should be comfortable to wear. This is probably the most important function of the cuff. Granted, it should stay on your arm and keep you teetered to the board, but a good leash will become part of you too. Good cuffs are generally made from neoprene with a velcro strap. They should be durable and waterproof. The velcro should be durable and should not begin to break down after a few uses.

Look for a wide cuff to add comfort when you are wearing it. You should also look for a brass connecter. The cuff will join to the coil, and there should be a connecter which should have a wide range of movement. Brass is ideal for this and will provide a long-lasting bodyboard leash.

Coils

The choir will be your buffer between the cuff and the plug. It should be long enough to give you some room on the board, but short enough that when you do come off the board, the board does not get too far. The coil should be springy so that it can lengthen and shorten depending on your needs. Look for a coil made from polyurethane or another high-quality material.

FAQs

Q_-Should-I-Use-A-Bicep-Leash-Or-A-Wrist-Leash_

Q: Should I Use A Bicep Leash Or A Wrist Leash?

A: There are two types of bodyboard leash. As the question would suggest, one attaches to your bicep, and one attaches to your wrist. You can choose between either option, depending on your preferences, and there really is no right or wrong answer when it comes to picking.

Most often you will find wrist leashes on beginner riders or drop-knee bodyboarding. For beginners, the draw is the ease of getting your board back. When you do come off your board, it is easy to grab the cord and bring your board back to you.

For drop-knee bodyboarders, it makes sense, as you are sitting higher on your board. Instead of laying flat as you surf through the waves, you are on one knee. Having the leash on your bicep could provide too much distance between the cuff and the board, creating a little tension and throwing the experience off.

As you progress in your bodyboarding adventure, or if you have boarded for a while, then you will probably have the leash on your bicep. As you become more used to being in the water with your board, you will find it easier to get your board back should you come off. Having the leash on your wrist stops the coil from getting in your way when you are paddling through the water. When it is on your wrist, you are constantly pulling the coil through the water with you.

Q: How Should A Bodyboard Leash Fit?

A: The quick answer is, that it should fit comfortably. Most bodyboard leashes will come with a velcro strap, so it is easy to have the leash fit tightly and comfortably. When the cuff is around your wrist or bicep, it should be tight enough that it does not move and slip down your arm, but the important thing to focus on, is that it does not bite into your skin. When your arm is relaxed, the leash should not be digging into your skin.

Q: How Do You Put On A Bicep Or Wrist Leash?

A: The first thing to do, is to choose where you are going to put the leash. Are you going to attach it to your wrist or to your bicep? Bend your arm so that it is at a right angle (bent at the elbow), and flex your arm a little (this position will help to recreate the position and feel of your arm as you are paddling through the water). Place the cuff on your arm and wrap the velcro around so that it is tight but comfortable. Move your arm around with the cuff on. Bend it back and forth, and flex and un-flex. If the cuff does not feel good, then loosen or tighten it. When you have the perfect fit, you are ready to bodyboard.

Q: How Do I Plug Your Bodyboard For A Leash?

A: Plugging your board for a leash is a relatively simple operation, and one which you can do by yourself, but there are some strict guidelines about how this should be done and where you can put the plug, so that you get the best placement, best ride, and do not damage your board in the process.

If your board already has a hole for a plug, then you do not need to do anything. Buy a leash and attach it to your board. If you do not have a hole in your board, then you can add one quickly, and with tools you probably have around your house.

The first thing to do is to choose the position of the hole you are going to create. There are some places where you should not create a hole in your board. Most bodyboards come with a stinger inside. Small boards will have one, and larger boards can have two. A stinger is a plastic rod which sits inside the foam of your board, to strengthen the board. Not all boards have one, so yours may not, but if you hold your board up to the light, then you should be able to see the stringer inside.

Do not create a hole where the stringer is (obviously), and do not create one too close to the stringer. You should aim to have the hole at least an inch from a stringer. If you do create a hole too close, then water can get inside and around the stringer. This may not actually damage your board, but the water can sit in there, making your board a little heavier. You will also have to put up with the noise of the water sloshing around.

You should also not create a hole close to the edge of the board. If you do create one too close, then the structural integrity can become compromised, and a large wave could cause the plug to be ripped from the hole, leaving a large gash in your board. Keep the hole at least two inches from the side of the board.

The last place to avoid is where the board begins to curve up toward the nose of the board. You should be looking for a flat piece of the board to make your hole in. So, what do you need to think about when choosing the placement?

One of the most obvious things to think about is whether you are going to be wearing the leash on your left arm or your right arm. The arm you are wearing the leash on will dictate the side of the board you will attach the plug to. You should also know if you are going to wear the leash on your wrist or your bicep. This will dictate how far up the board the plug will be. The last thing to think about is whether you are going to ride prone or drop-knee.

A prone rider is one who rides with their body flat on the board. A drop-knee rider rides with one knee and one foot on the board. Your distance between the cuff and the board will dictate where on the board you can place the plug, so you do not create too much tension in the coil.

Once you have used all of the information at your disposal to choose where you can and cannot place the plug, you should have a general idea in mind. Within that area, you can choose the spot which feels best to you. Take into account what feels good, and also what looks good. This hole is going to be permanent, so you should be happy with the position before you commit to it. Make sure that the plug is not going to be under any points of pressure, such as your chest if you are riding prone, or your knee if you are riding drop-knee. Once you have the exact position, mark it with a marker, and you are ready to create the hole.

A Phillips head screwdriver will do the trick. A drill will work also. Take your board and place it on a flat surface. Lay a towel underneath if you are worried about the bottom of the board, but remember that this could get damaged when you make your hole. Take your tool (either the screwdriver or drill) and line it up as straight as possible. You are going to push the screwdriver through the board and out the other side.

Apply pressure to the screwdriver, and twist it as you push through to help it through the foam. Once you are done, flip the board and push through from the other side to make a clean hole. Now, take your flu and check it for size. There are two parts to the plug, so be sure to check the larger of the two pieces first. If the plug does not fit, then use your screwdriver to widen the hols slightly. You want to try and create an exact fit, so enlarge the hole a little at a time.

Once the largest piece fits snugly, push in the second part from the other side and twist the two parts to tighten them. Once the two pieces of the plug will not tighten anymore, you can use a small coin to give them a final tighten. Each side of the plug should end up flush with the board. You will create a seal which will not allow the water in (most of the time), but do not worry if the water does get in. The foam interior is waterproof, so the water will not get into the material and damage it.

Now, make sure to take care of your leash once it is attached. Rinse your leash after each outing in the water (you should be doing the same with your board). You do not want the salt water sitting on your leash for too long, or it can become corrosive. When you are storing your leash, you should store it in the same place as you board. The leash should be kept out of direct sunlight when in storage. It should be kept somewhere cool and dry. If you are strong the board and leash together, you should store them in a place where there is no chance of the leash being snagged. You do not want to damage the leash or the board.

Globo Surf Overview

A few bucks and you may not have to buy yourself a new bodyboard. If you let a bodyboard escape in the ocean, you may as well be throwing your money into the water. A good bodyboard leash will fit you comfortably and give you security. If you have a leash correctly attached to your board, you will be taking a precaution which will save your board. Even if your board does not get away from you, retrieving it after falling in the water is infinitely easier with a leash attached. It does not matter if you are buying one for safety or to make your life easier, it just makes sense to have one with you at all times.

The best bodyboarding leashes were not hard to find. Our top five are the very best that the boarding wold has to offer (in our opinion). With the information above, you can make an informed choice when it comes to enhancing your bodyboarding experience. Be safe out there.

Globo Surf Bodyboard Leash Reviews

★★★★★
5 5 1
It's hard to find a good bodyboard leash and Im happy to say I found the perfect leash on this site. The BPS Storm works amazing, highly recommended for bodyboarding.

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My name is David Hamburg. I am an avid water sports fan who enjoys paddle boarding, surfing, scuba diving, and kite surfing. Anything with a board or chance I can get in the water I love! I am such a big fan I decided to start this website to review all my favorite products and some others. Hope you enjoy!